Citizen Cyberscience Summit 2014 schedule

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Thursday 20th February 2014

  • Arrival and Registration

    At 9:30am to 10:00am, Thursday 20th February

    In Royal Geographical Society

  • Welcome Address

    by Francois Grey

    At 10:00am to 10:10am, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Lessons From A Year of Citizen Science

    by James Borrell

    The variety of citizen science projects available - from the structure of proteins to mapping galaxies - is staggering, and continues to grow. Here I give a citizen’s perspective on the benefits of participation, and explore how these extend far beyond data collection and analysis.

    At 10:10am to 10:35am, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

    Coverage slide deck

  • The creative life of #citizenscience

    by erinmaochu

    Whilst #citizenscience projects contribute to scientific policy and practice globally, learning, fun and innovations often spring from humans interacting with, and getting creative with their data.

    Explore, celebrate and share the creative life of data. Glean insights into how habits, quirks and everyday creativity enhances learning, scientific inquiry and social innovation.

    At 10:35am to 11:00am, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

    Coverage slide deck

  • Citizen Science with the Zooniverse

    by Robert Simpson

    The Zooniverse is enabling citizen science across multiple domains from astronomy to zoology and more than 900,000 volunteers have signed up to take part. This talk will describe the platform and talk about its future.

    At 11:00am to 11:20am, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

    Coverage slide deck

  • Tea & Coffee Break

    At 11:20am to 11:40am, Thursday 20th February

    In Royal Geographical Society

  • Citizen Science, Expertise and Information Sharing (TBC)

    by Jacquie McGlade

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 11:40am to 12:00pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • EyeWire - A game to map the brain

    by Amy Robinson

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 11:40am to 12:00pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Citizen Science Association: an ironic story on the necessity for professionalization

    by Caren Cooper

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 12:00pm to 12:20pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • World Community Grid and Volunteer Computing on Mobile Phones

    by Juan Hindo (nee Allos)

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 12:00pm to 12:20pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Crowdcrafting: An Open Source Platform for Citizen Science Projects

    by Daniel Lombraña González

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    Crowdcrafting empowers citizens to become active players in scientific projects by donating their time in order to solve micro-task problems or by becoming researchers creating their own projects in minutes. This results in making science more accessible to everyone, engaging society in science.

    Unlike other solutions, Crowdcrafting is 100% open source, it provides nice tutorials to set up your own application as well as several templates ready to use for image, sound or video pattern recognition, as well as for PDF transcriptions and geocoding problems. Its integration with other data tools (EpiCollect for capturing data or CKAN to store and share data), makes Crowdcrafting a really powerful and unique citizen science platform.

    Thanks to its simplicity, Crowdcrafting has been used by citizens to analyze the impact of Fracking in the US, study the conviction rates of judges in Iceland, transcribe the public budget of the Spanish city Sevilla, etc.

    International institutions like CERN for example have used the platform to study antimatter, United Nations (UNITAR) and National Institute of Space Research of Brazil (INPE) are using the technology behind Crowdcrafting to assess deforestation using only a web browser, the London Nano Center who invite citizens to help them in the analysis of nano molecules or the Public Health Group from Switzerland who used the platform to geolocate houses to deliver their new mosquito trap to fight Malaria.

    At 12:20pm to 12:40pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • The European Citizen Science Association: the Emerging Network

    by Andrea Sforzi

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    Everyone should have the opportunity to play their part in the protection of the places and ecosystems where they live and work. ECSA will start to make that happen in Europe.
    ECSA will advance and promote citizen science in a Europe where citizens are valued as a key component, advancing knowledge about the sustainable development of our world.
    Engaging with disadvantaged communities is also a key goal of ECSA. Individuals will be encouraged to take an active role in the development of a sustainable society, helping to protect and improve health and the environment.

    ECSA will:
    • support the growth of national citizen science communities across the EU;
    • share knowledge and skills on citizen science;
    • develop EU wide citizen science programmes;
    • identify, develop and promote best practice and excellence in citizen science;
    • collaborate with the growing international citizen science community.

    The Association has been very recently registered in Berlin.
    Prof. Dr. Johannes Vogel has been appointed as director, Dr. Andrea Sforzi and Prof. Dr. Jaqueline McGlade have been elected as co-directors.

    Delegates from 12 European Countries took part to the preliminary meetings.
    Four working groups have been created so far (chairman):
    - Fundraising, membership, communications, promotion and marketing and events (Josep Perello)
    - Policy, strategy, governance and partnerships (Martin Brocklehurst)
    - Standards, principles, best practice and capacity building (Lucy Robinson)
    - Projects, data, tools and technology (Jaume Piere).

    The ECSA first General Assembly will be held in Copenhagen on the next 8th April.
    If you would like to take part, please contact Katrin Vohland (Katrin.Vohland@mfn-berlin.de).

    ECSA preliminary internet site: http://ecsa.biodiv.naturkundemus...

    At 12:20pm to 12:40pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Citizen science opportunities within Horizon 2020

    by Ralph Dum

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 12:40pm to 1:00pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Let's talk about science and the web

    by Kaitlin Thaney

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    The Mozilla Science Lab is a new initiative of the Mozilla Foundation exploring how the power of the open web can change the way science is done. We build educational resources, tools and prototypes for the research community to make science more open, collaborative and efficient.

    But what does the "power of the web" truly mean? This talk will look at recent work of the Mozilla Science Lab, as well as delve into the characteristics of the web that underpin and enable open research.

    At 12:40pm to 1:00pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Lunch

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Royal Geographical Society

  • Citizen Science - What's Policy Got to Do With It?

    by Lea Shanley

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    Policy is an important but often overlooked component of citizen science projects. There are operational data policy considerations, such as user agreements, terms of use, and privacy. There are laws and regulations that may either encourage or inhibit government use of citizen science data. In the United States, these include the U.S. Paperwork Reduction Action, U.S. Data Quality Act, and U.S. Anti-Deficiency Act. And, there is the potential impact of citizen science on public policy objectives. This presentation will touch on each of these three areas. Presented by Lea Shanley and Anne Bowser, Commons Lab, Wilson Center.

    At 1:50pm to 2:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

    Coverage link

  • Quantum Moves: Testing Player Efficiency in Solving Quantum Research Challenges

    by Mads Kock and Andreea Catalina Marin

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    Quantum Moves: Testing player efficiency in solving quantum research challenges
    Mads Kock Pedersen, Andreea Catalina Marin, Jacob F. Sherson

    Citizen science is a rapidly growing field; however, citizen science does not have many implementations in quantum physics. This is probably due to the difficulty of explaining the sometimes highly counterintuitive nature of quantum phenomena, and resulting difficulties designing a platform that enables users to contribute to this highly specialized field of research.

    Quantum Moves (QM) is a new scientific research game that lets online players help solve real quantum physical research problems. The aim of QM is twofold. We have a specific set of research problems concerning the development of a quantum computer. We expect players to do well on the challenge not only due to the sheer number of players, but also because of human skills such as pattern recognition and intuitive cognitive capabilities related to spatial navigation. In all branches of citizen science it is of interest to know how large at fraction of the community are able to contribute to science with their actions. Parallel to the main data gathering through QM, we seek to answer that question by quantitatively investigating how human solutions compare to optimization algorithms in a wide range of quantum-inspired problems.
    We present preliminary results showing how our community compares to optimization algorithms, on our quantum computer challenge and in a variety of more general problems.

    In QM, the community is included in the design process both directly by contributing with ideas and suggestions and indirectly as test cases. We present the different phases of the design process from our first beta version failures including way too many options, too little help, and too difficult access, to a recent 2x2 A/B design-experiment where a large group of new community members unknowingly, were presented with four slightly different versions of the game in order to investigate hypothesized motivational structures in the design. We discuss the difficulties deriving from the quantum nature of our problem, and how we try to solve them by gradually empowering our community to perform better on our scientific challenges.

    Customized versions of QM were implemented and tested at different stages of the design process in Danish science classrooms. Our preliminary results shows that students are highly motivated by the aspect of doing “real science”, however they need help linking the knowledge and spatial skills they obtain in the game to their “normal” physics education. The design process of making a strong link from game to the physics behind, which is also important to a segment of the online players, is ongoing based on the feedback of students as well as the online community.

    QM is the first game on our webpage www.scienceathome.org. We are currently working on implementing more quantum physics citizen science games, as well as a new game where players can help making good causal hypotheses about player motivation, behavior and performance. Our vision is to collect a broad spectrum of gamified research problems in scienceathome.org, making it a hub for citizen scientists who want to contribute to science at home.

    At 1:50pm to 2:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Learning and Awareness in Participatory Sensing

    by Vito D.P. Servedio

    Learning nowadays should be more synonymous of ability to carefully read the complex environment we live in and to identify the most important instruments to adapt to it and to help in taking decisions.
    In this talk I will briefly show how users learn to recognize the noise level around them by continuously using the WideNoise mobile application and how they are able to estimate the air pollution levels by annotating the map of their city.

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 2:10pm to 2:30pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Supporting successful & community-based participatory sensing campaigns

    by Ellie D'Hondt

    In this talk we argue the need for balancing the basic pillars technology, data and people in participatory sensing frameworks, and discuss how we visited and revisit these aspects in our past, present and future work. An important bridging notion therein is that of a campaign. We argue the need for orchestration support for campaigns to achieve data quality, automatisation of said support to achieve scalability, and user-friendliness to reach as many stakeholders as possible. Note this goes further than merely providing support for defining campaigns, an issue tackled in several recent research projects. We provide a formal definition of a campaign by extracting commonalities from expertise in organising collaborative mapping campaigns with NoiseTube. Next, we formalise how to ensure that campaigns end successfully (in terms of data quality), and translate this formal notion into an operational recipe for campaign monitoring orchestration. We then present a framework for automatising campaign orchestration which relies on workflow technology and meta-logic reasoning. We end by expanding on requirements to expand upon the 3 pillars of participatory sensing, i.e. allowing more people to collect heterogeneous data with generalised technological platforms. We argue that to make this feasible it is crucial to construct platforms which are reconfigurable by stakeholders (who are not ICT experts), and present a roadmap for achieving this goal.

    At 2:10pm to 2:30pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Citizen Science in the Context of Tree Health and Plant Biosecurity Policy (TBC)

    by Andrea Deol

    *This talk is part of the POLICY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 2:30pm to 2:50pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Sapelli: A mobile data collection platform for everyone

    by Matthias Stevens

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    At 2:30pm to 2:50pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • CitSci.org: a comprehensive citizen science support platform

    by Greg Newman

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE track*

    Citizen science and community-based monitoring programs are increasing in number, breadth, and popularity. These programs operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales, address myriads of issues, generate volumes of diverse scientific data, and involve numerous stakeholders. To be effective, such programs must ask questions, form teams, manage members, identify protocols, collect data, share results, and evaluate success. On face value, these tasks may seem simple. In reality, they are diverse, complex, and demanding of limited program resources. To address these challenges, we built an open and comprehensive cyber-infrastructure support system for citizen science programs (www.citsci.org) to support the full spectrum of program management and data management, analysis, and visualization needs. The system affords program coordinators the opportunity to create their own projects, manage project members, build their own data sheets, streamline data entry, visualize data on maps, automate custom analyses, and get feedback. Thus far, CitSci.org has engaged 78+ programs resulting in some 12,838+ species observations and 33,694+ site characteristics. The majority of programs are bottom-up, grassroots efforts with conservation biology-oriented goals and objectives. Here, we discuss the unique opportunities afforded by CitSci.org platform to support the needs of citizen science programs; connect people, nature, and research; and encourage and foster meta-analyses across domains and projects.

    At 2:50pm to 3:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

    Coverage link

  • The OPAL Tree Health Survey

    by Hilary Geoghegan and David Slawson

    The Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) tree health survey was developed by a partnership involving a wide range of Government agencies, devolved administrations, academia and third sector organisations. The survey aims to raise the public’s awareness of trees and tree health. Additionally, citizens will act as extra eyes for pests and diseases which are threatening our trees, thereby supporting surveillance by the limited number of official forestry and plant health inspectors. Such prompt detection should give us the best possible chance of eradicating the pest or disease before it becomes established.

    At 2:50pm to 3:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Tea & Coffee Break

    At 3:10pm to 3:30pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Royal Geographical Society

  • It Takes a Village: Engaging Participants Beyond Clickwork

    by scicheer

    *This talk is part of the CREATIVITY & LEARNING track*

    At 3:30pm to 3:50pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • The Faces of Data: Building Citizen Science Communities by Putting People First.

    by Yasser Ansari

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE (BIOLOGY) track*

    In many places, the term "amateur" gets thrown around as a derogatory term. Amateurs are considered hacks or half-wits, but what happens when we embrace the amateur and remind ourselves that the term is rooted in the idea of pursuing something simply for the love it? We remember that the greatest pursuit is one based on passion and, as communities, we end up creating more value than we capture when we put people 1st and data 2nd. Through the process of designing and building Project Noah, one of the largest online communities for wildlife exploration and environmental education, we have learned that amazing breakthroughs can be made when we put people first and encourage amateurs and experts to collide.

    At 3:30pm to 3:50pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • DIY Biology - the Public Biobrick & Darwin Toolbox

    by Philipp Boeing

    *This talk is part of the TECHNOLOGY AND CITIZEN SCIENCE (BIOLOGY) track*

    “Do it youself” biology is a relatively recent umbrella term for citizen science in molecular biotechnology. The talk will give an overview of the opportunities and challenges of this branch of citizen science focusing in particular on the activities that we have been involved in since collaborating with “biohackers” via the UCL iGEM team (international genetically engineered machine competition).
    This will include the “Public BioBrick” collaboration between a group of London based “biohackers” and UCL’s team.
    The talk will make the case for specific hardware, software and wetware that is necessary for DIYbio. As an example, we are presenting DarwinToolbox, a biotechnology laboratory “in a box” for citizen science and education. Darwin Toolbox is under active development at UCL and we are very interested in any feedback that we might get from participants at the summit.

    At 3:50pm to 4:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Opening New Doors: Unexpected Learning in Citizen Science

    by Laure Kloetzer

    *This talk is part of the CREATIVITY & LEARNING track*

    Citizen Science Workshop: Designing with the Volunteer in Mind

    In this workshop we will be exploring how to design a web-based citizen science project with the volunteer in mind. We are hoping to bring together designers, evaluators, and volunteers of citizen science projects. Workshop participants will be asked to reflect upon their own experience to answer the following questions:

    · What makes a citizen science project enjoyable for volunteers?
    · What makes a citizen science project useful for volunteers?

    Relevant themes include: motivation, engagement, community, learning and creativity.

    By the end of the workshop we hope to generate a list of best practice guidelines for designing a web-based citizen science project. These guidelines will be posted on the Citizen Cyberlab website.

    At 3:50pm to 4:10pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • Environmental and Science Learning through Public Participation in Scientific Research: From Learning to Action

    by Heidi Ballard

    *This talk is part of the CREATIVITY & LEARNING track*
    Public Participation in Scientific Research (PPSR) occurs in a much wider variety of contexts and disciplines than many people realize, ranging from birders collecting diversity data to community-based organizations studying local air and water quality. Based on work with colleagues, I will describe our framework that attempts to capture this wide range, examining scientific and participant objectives and outcomes, and the strengths that can be drawn from each to bolster the impacts of the other across Contributory, Collaborative and Co-Created projects. My key focus will be on the complexities of the concept of participation, examining the degree and quality of participation in these myriad PPSR projects, and how these affect the benefits to the public participants, the scientists, and the larger social-ecological system. Through a collaborative NSF-funded meta-analysis of adult programs and a comparative case study of youth programs, I am surveying and interviewing participants to examine how participation impacts individuals in terms of their science and environmental learning. What do individuals learn about science and environmental stewardship by participating? What do children learn about civic engagement and themselves as scientists? As the field of PPSR grows, many of us as researchers are moving beyond project-level impacts to look at the comparative impacts, processes and practices across many PPSR projects. I hope to facilitate practitioners and researchers of PPSR in education, natural sciences and social justice to think about how their work might connect to, impact, expand and inspire the work of people outside their traditional disciplines and networks.

    At 4:10pm to 4:30pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Education Centre, Royal Geographical Society

  • PEARL - Understanding the close-interaction pattern among people and its application in controling respiratory epidemics

    by Dongbo Bu

    Pandemic spread of infectious respiratory diseases is among the biggest threats to human society due
    to their high mortality and frequent occurrences. As a result, it is of high priority for governments and health organisations to predict such cases and devise effective control strategies. A prerequisite of this task is a deep understanding of human contact networks, since respiratory diseases predominantly transmit via droplets and air-borne route both of which work only in physically close proximity interactions (CPIs).

    Consequently, we developed PEARL, an application running on Android mobile phones, to probe physical interactions among people in real life. With helps from 375 volunteers in a college of a Chinese university, we acquired the real interaction data lasting for 90 days. Analysis suggests that the physical interactions among students is neither scale-free nor small-world. The special interaction pattern leads to a special spreading pattern for infectious disease such as influenza, TB, etc. Simulation also suggests that "class-cancelation" strategy is more efficient than other quarantining strategies.

    At 4:10pm to 4:30pm, Thursday 20th February

    In Ondaatje Theatre, Royal Geographical Society