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Kansas Linux Fest schedule

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Saturday 21st March 2015

  • Keynote : Mesos/Aurora

    by Dave Lester

    At 9:00am to 10:00am, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • KeyNote:

    by Hal Gottfried

    TBA

    At 10:00am to 11:00am, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • GSM network security hacking via Osmocom

    by Craig Comstock

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room C, Lawrence Public Library

  • Node.js NPM

    by Seth Etter

    At 11:00am to 12:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • Argus/Ancor : next generation framework for cloud automation and security

    by Alex Bardas

    Cloud Security

    Cloud computing has the potential to revolutionize the way businesses run their IT infrastructure and achieve new efficiencies of scale. However, security and long-term trustworthiness of cloud infrastructures is often a significant barrier to their wider adoption as well as a significant risk. This research addresses a fundamental root cause of many security/trustworthiness problems of the cloud - the lack of a suitable abstraction for defining cloud-based IT systems. As a result of this deficiency, cloud system deployment and management is largely based on low-level scripts or manual interventions that yield poorly configured, stagnant, and fragile systems that invite misuse and failures. Moreover, economic incentives drive cloud vendors to "lock in" their customers, making it difficult for cloud users to switch to a new vendor even if the current vendor is doing a poor job of ensuring the cloud services' security and reliability.

    To alleviate these problems, we propose an abstract model for defining cloud-based IT systems and design a compilation process to automatically generate concrete systems in the cloud based on the abstract specifications. Our high-level abstract model will capture important structural information about the system, such as service dependencies, as well as implementation specifications that refer to re-usable knowledge units that define various service and application configuration details. This approach will allow us to conduct a number of research thrusts in the framework: 1) reliably generating cloud-based IT systems with both correct functionality and strong security; 2) providing a consistent model that captures the configuration state of deployed systems, and enabling automated orchestration of system changes while maintaining the desired properties; 3) security analysis, threat isolation and mitigation, and fault diagnosis using this abstraction; and 4) leveraging the abstraction to design technologies to support the easy movement between vendors, both as a way of increasing the cloud user's trust in the cloud as well as an incentive for cloud vendors to compete based on their services' quality, most importantly security and trustworthiness.

    http://www.arguslab.org/

    At 1:00pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • Breaking the Confinement Cycle Using Linux and Open-Source Software/Hardware

    by Spencer Hunley

    This presentation will discuss current accessibility and assistive technology (AT) in Linux, what's working and not working (focusing on both the Confinement Cycle and the problems Ken Starks has recently run into), and what needs to be done to improve accessibility and the AT applications in Linux. Furthermore, it will also cover efforts myself and others are working on to create an automated home using open-source software, microcontroller boards and wireless connections.

    At 1:00pm to 2:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room C, Lawrence Public Library

  • Open Source Access Control System

    by Joshua Montgomery

    Josh Montgomery from Wicked Broadband (http://www.lawrencefreenet.org/) will talk about the open source access control system he built for the Lawrence Center for Entrepreneurship http://larryville-entrepreneur.b...

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room B, Lawrence Public Library

  • Proper Care and Feeding of a MySQL Database for Linux Admins

    by David Stokes

    MySQL is the most popular database on the web but do you know how to keep your instances happy, tag wagging, and with a shiny coat? Database are the nasty, wanton children of the software world and can quickly become the bane of a system admin's life. This session covers best practices for administration, backup, replication, hardware, and more. So learn how to take care on your MySQL instances and and have a happy database in your server farm.

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • RPM Building 101

    by Brian Stinson

    The Specfile and the corresponding rpmbuild invocations

    Intermediate tools: (mock)
    Advanced tools: koji (Fedora and CentOS build systems)

    At 2:00pm to 3:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room C, Lawrence Public Library

  • Asterisk vs Freeswitch

    by Jeff Roberson

    At 3:00pm to 4:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • Getting Started With Go

    by Jacob Walker

    At 3:00pm to 4:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room C, Lawrence Public Library

  • Rackspace break-fix competition

    by Alex juarez

    Rackspace break-fix competition. The competition pitted System Administrators comfortable with the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP or Perl) platform against one another in a 4 question, 20 minute contest.

    A break-fix competition presents problems with an otherwise working system that must be resolved. System administrators call upon their knowledge and troubleshooting abilities in a break-fix competition and is a good gauge of the depth of those skills and abilities. The Rackspace break-fix is tailored toward the Hosting industry as that is our forte.

    At 3:00pm to 4:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room B, Lawrence Public Library

  • Haskell in the Cloud

    by Andy Gill

    In this talk, we will introduce Haskell, a functional programming language. We will explain how Haskell is a great language for building mini-languages, often called Domain Specific Languages (DSLs). We will introduce several DSLs in practice, and look at how they can be used to make distributed computing easier and more robust. No Haskell knowledge is required to get something out of this talk.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • Tutorial on Linux File Access Control

    by Ben C. Roose

    An introduction to file and directory permissions in Unix, concepts of the Extend filesystem structure, and basic theory of hard/soft links with practical applications.

    At 4:00pm to 5:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Meeting Room C, Lawrence Public Library

  • KeyNote: Smells Like Teen Systems

    by Frank Wiles

    Smells Like Teen Systems:
    Advice for raising healthy happy systems and getting to devops Nirvana
    A hopefully entertaining talk on doing better development and operations from what I have seen work and NOT work with various clients.

    At 5:00pm to 6:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Main Room, Lawrence Public Library

  • After Conference Party

    by Joshua Montgomery

    The Lawrence Center for Entrepreneurship
    http://www.openstreetmap.org/nod...

    will host a after party at the space. Drinks and snacks will be provided.

    At 7:00pm to 10:00pm, Saturday 21st March

    In Lawrence Center for Entrepreneurship

Sunday 22nd March 2015