Sessions at Lone Star PHP 2017 on Saturday 22nd April

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  • Serving 30,000,000 Requests an Hour in the Cloud

    by Terrence Ryan

    You've written an application and now the worst thing that can happen to you has come about - People are using it! You now have load spikes to deal with. You can scale up to deal with the excess traffic, but what do you do when your load is variable? How do you do that, and stay on budget?

    This session is a case study on getting an App Engine app to scale to serve 30,000,000 requests an hour. It will take you through the architecture, the code changes and the technology trade offs to get to that level of traffic.

    At 9:00am to 9:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Status Change: Now Using Event Sourcing

    by Emily Stamey

    Being flexible to changes in business process makes our jobs easier, and it helps our applications adapt to those changes with minimal code changes. One of the biggest adaptions in our applications has been the addition of Event Sourcing to make a note of an Event that happened in the system. With these Events, we can affect change immediately, or even later. This is most helpful in our reporting interfaces. We can build, change, and throw away our reports very easily. This is much easier than our older reports being generated by large SQL queries.

    Attendees will learn:
    - idealogical differences between status flags and events
    - triggering events in your application
    - handling events to reflect the state of your application data
    - building reports from events that are easy to chang

    At 9:00am to 9:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • You Don't Node.js (or, How JavaScript Actually Works)

    by ᴠᴀɴᴄᴇ ʟᴜᴄᴀꜱ

    JavaScript and Node.js can be a powerful tools used in the right situations, but they also have more footguns than PHP does for new developers. Asynchronous programming style, concurrency issues, error handling, the event loop, and no default timeouts for HTTP requests or network calls will give new developers more than their fair share of troubles and can cause issues that are difficult to debug and reproduce.

    This talk gives a brief introduction to Node.js and the event loop model (don’t block the event loop!), and covers common pitfalls when using Node.js with simple and practical solutions.

    At 9:00am to 9:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • I'd Like to Write the World Some Docs

    by Steve Grunwell

    It takes a special kind of person to enjoy writing documentation; not only do I have to write [ideally] working code, but now I have to write words that a human being can understand? What is this madness?!

    Luckily, good documentation lives on outside your codebase. By following common documentation standards, we can generate comprehensive manuals that instruct others how to integrate with our software. After all, to code is human, but to document is divine.

    At 10:00am to 10:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Practical PHP Deployment with Jenkins

    by Adam Culp

    Developers would love to "automate all the things", but where do we start? What tools exist for automating? And what can actually be automated? If we don't have unit tests can we still benefit from deployment automation? Adam Culp will show how a PHP application pulled from git, complete with unit tests, Composer dependency management, and package creation, can be deployed flawlessly using Jenkins. Then see how "Dev" and "Ops" are supported by a system if the application breaks through automated rollbacks.

    At 10:00am to 10:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Tests Should Tell a Story

    by Matthew Machuga

    PHP has been adopting testing on a wider scale over the past several years, and it feels like we're finally at a point where we can start to sharpen our skills and tools, rather than rallying to see any testing at all. At this point we should start ensuring that our tests tell the story we'd like them to.

    Through an analogy of storytelling, this talk aims to help you be the hero of your testing story by giving new context and perspective to the way a test suite should read to both your colleagues and your future self. We'll demonstrate how proper naming and assertions can lead to simpler, faster debugging. We'll also see how an end-to-end test has a far more compelling story when you focus on describing the feature and business goals over describing a specific UI workflow in painful detail.

    At 10:00am to 10:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • /Regex Makes Me (Weep|Give Up|(╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻).?/i

    by brettflorio

    REGEX! Love it or hate it, sometimes you actually need it. And when that time comes, there’s no reason to be afraid or to ask for help from that weirdo on your team who actually loves regular expressions. (I’m that weirdo, fwiw.)

    This session is geared towards beginning and intermediate regex users, and will cover topics using practical examples that you might encounter in your own projects.

    • What is regex? How's it work? A brief history.
    • Syntax, special characters, character classes
    • Grouping, capturing, and common gotchas
    • More advanced topics like: Backreferences; Passive groups; Lookarounds (my favorite)
    • PHP pattern matching and replacements
    • Regex in JavaScript, and js-specific limitations

    At 11:00am to 11:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • How I Learned to Stop Caring and Made Better Software

    by Eli White

    Best practices are important, but are they always the best for your situation? I spent years working on large software projects where best practices were crucial. Milestone planning, multiple code branching, 99.9% uptime requirements, heavy testing, deployment processes, etc. But I then blindly applied those to every project afterward. In retrospect, that hurt many projects, especially in smaller companies and startups where the speed of innovation was more important and downtime acceptable. In this session, learn from my experience and discover where cutting corners is not only acceptable but better for the project. At the same time, determine which practices are crucial and should be used no matter what!

    At 11:00am to 11:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Rise of the Nodebots

    by Joel Lord

    So you’ve finally managed to build a full stack application, all in Javascript. But what if your hardware programming could be done with Javascript too? In this introduction to Nodebots, you will learn how to use NodeJs to build a robot using an Arduino board. Well, maybe not a full robot but at least a blinking LED. You will learn how to add basic sensors and other general electronic components and you will learn how you can do it by yourself, at home, on a minimal budget. Come to this talk and you too will be able to contribute to the Robocalypse.

    At 11:00am to 11:50am, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Job Queues with Gearman

    by Michael Moussa

    When higher traffic coupled with costly operations begin to degrade your site’s performance, an asynchronous job queue can be a valuable tool to help relieve the stress. With Gearman, PHP developers can easily farm out non-time-critical jobs like image processing, external API requests, and complex data processing operations to a pool of workers better suited to the task, leaving their webservers free to continue serving requests.

    Join Michael Moussa as he walks you through the basics of setting up a Gearman job server, writing clients to communicate with it, and creating workers to do the heavy lifting. After the basics are out of the way, he'll go into some pitfalls to watch out for when working with Gearman, as well as some tricks to make development easier.

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Projects are not Products

    by D. Keith Casey, Jr.

    If you build it, they will come.. well no, not really. Not even close.

    As developers, too often we believe the best tech wins. We want to believe customers care about clean code, the most features, and our architecture. It turns out, no one cares.

    When we’re building products, we need to understand the problem we’re solving, who we’re solving it for, and how to reach them. In this session, we'll review concrete steps and discuss how to turn your project into a product.

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • What WordPress Teaches Us About Software Ecosystems

    by David Hayes

    WordPress is almost certainly the most successful PHP software in the world. And that success is not — though some might joke that it is — an accident. In this talk we'll examine what WordPress has done right and what that can teach other software. We'll also talk about some of WordPress's problems, and understand how they mirror those of other large open-source projects.

    At 1:00pm to 1:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Effective Code Review: What to Say & How To Say It

    by Jessica Mauerhan

    Reviewing your peers' code is a critical part of working on a team - it helps prevent bugs and can give you understanding of parts of the application you haven't worked on. The key is knowing what to look for in a code review - and then communicating your thoughts in an effective way. In this session, we'll look at example PRs and practice reviewing them to get the best results.

    At 2:00pm to 2:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Smiling From the Wrists Down: Customer Service for Developers

    by Heather White

    Are you an experienced developer that is now in charge of other business tasks maybe as part of a small business or startup? Customer service can be tricky and leave a lasting impression. Come learn from first-hand experience what to expect, how to answer the question that is meant- not the one that is asked, and how to effectively communicate with your customer and achieve a better outcome for all.

    At 2:00pm to 2:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • More Than Just a Hammer

    by Ben Edmunds

    Learn to expand beyond just PHP to integrate other languages into both your personal skill set and the solutions you deliver.

    In this talk we'll cover integrating JavaScript (frontend and backend via node) and how you can expand your current skill set to include this or any other language alongside PHP. The old saying, if all you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail, is very true so let's learn how to use a wrench and maybe a chainsaw!

    Not only will this give you another tool in your tool belt, it will give you a greater understanding of development practices and the ability to on new jobs, new projects, and new challenges.

    At 3:00pm to 3:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Test-Driven Laravel

    by Adam Wathan

    Learning how to test your code can be overwhelming. Sure, building a calculator with TDD is easy, but when you're trying to build a real application, things get complicated fast.

    What's the difference between a mock and a stub? Are my tests allowed to hit the database? How do I test this billing code that interacts with Stripe?

    Together we'll TDD a fresh Laravel app from scratch, never writing a line of code without writing a test first. I'll show you how to get the ball rolling with your application's very first test, how to add new features with outside-in TDD, and how to design tests that make it easy to refactor with confidence.

    At 3:00pm to 3:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center

  • Groupies, Roadies, Rockstars

    by Cal Evans

    Contribute to Open Source!

    Everyone tells you that you need to. What if you don't want to run an Open Source project? What if you just need something to work? What if you just want to use Open Source, can you still make a contribution? Of course you can!

    In this talk we will look at three broad groupings of roles that you can play in any Open Source project. Take a look around, find your role and your project and make a difference.

    At 4:00pm to 4:50pm, Saturday 22nd April

    In Addison Conference Center